PRABHU KUTIR

Location: Mumbai, India

Type: Residencial

Project Size: 2200 sq ft

Context: A three-bedroom apartment shared by five people — two brothers and their respective families. The house was situated on the first floor of an apartment complex in the densely populated Juhu suburb of Mumbai. The brief was to maximise the amount of space, not just in terms of logistical requirements like that of storage, but also in how the house could be inhabited by the family as a whole, as well as its individual members.

Constraints: The space was originally dark and gloomy, with almost almost no source of natural light. Structurally, the house was crumbling with traces of cracks and leakage present throughout. Although the house had medium sized rooms with large bathrooms and balconies, the space as a whole felt cramped for five people. Furthermore, the budget was tight.

Constraints: The space was originally dark and gloomy, with almost no source of natural light. Structurally, the house was crumbling, with traces of cracks and leakage present throughout. Although the house had medium-sized rooms with large bathrooms and balconies, the space as a whole felt cramped for five people. Furthermore, the budget was tight.

Our approach: The aim was to make the space as aery and light-filled as possible. Gutting down the entire apartment, we started from scratch by first fixing structural issues. Pushing windows outward, and taking in the balconies allowed us to open up the space by making the rooms larger, and maximizing the amount of sunlight that came in. To be creative with the budget, we focused on upcycling existing furniture, and invested in only key statement pieces.

The living room was designed as an expansive space with large windows, ceiling to floor wooden vertical rafters set against mirrored walls, that both gave depth and height to the room.

Doors to the bedrooms were concealed within these rafter-mirror panels, to maintain seamlessness. With a large seating area, the space was designed to entertain guests, allow the residents to spend time as a family, as well as have small seater options, provided by intimate corner spaces. The rooms that belonged to the couples were designed to be master bedrooms — doubling up as bedroom and lounge. Walk-in closets were created by making the bathrooms a bit smaller. Strong vertical lines were used throughout the house, whether through the wooden rafters, room dividers or headboard details. Concurrently, the house was also filled with organic textures and colors which came in through elements like the wall art, lighting fixtures, plants and the exterior scenery made more visible through the bigger windows. Through the use of seamless design details and reflective materials, the space of the original flat was magnified.

The aim was to make the space as aery and lightfilled as possible.

Small seater options, provided by intimate corner spaces.

Large seating area, designed to entertain and spend time as a family.

Doors to bedrooms were concealed within these rafter-mirror panels, so as to maintain seamlessness.

Windows pushed outwards, balconies taken in allowing the space to open up; making the rooms larger.

Maximized the amount of sunlight that came in.

Through the use of these seamless design details and reflective materials, the space of the original flat was magnified.

Concurrently, the house was also filled with organic textures and colors which came in through elements like the wall art, lighting fixtures, plants.

Strong vertical lines were used throughout the house, whether in the wooden rafters, room dividers or headboard details.

The exterior scenery made more visible through the bigger windows.

The Dewan in the nursery was originally a antique bed inherited by the family.

To be creative with the budget, we focused on upcycling existing furniture and invested in only in key statement pieces.

Inhabited by, and designed for, young newly-weds and elderly In-laws, this apartment is a combination of both contemporary and classic aesthetic.

The rooms that belonged to the couples were designed to be masters, doubling up as bedroom and lounge.

Walk-in closets were created by making the bathrooms a bit smaller.